Jobs

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Director of Natural History Museum

Date Posted: 29 Jul 2015 (Show details)

Institution: Miami University
Location: Oxford, Ohio
Closing date: Screening of applications begins 10 August 2015, and will continue until the position is filled.

The Department of Biology at Miami University is seeking a Director for the Hefner Museum of Natural History. The starting date is January 1, 2016.

The Museum Director will have overall responsibility for the museum and its educational goals and strategic plan, and is responsible for all matters concerning personnel, space, budget, and the search for external funding to support museum outreach. The Museum Director is a staff member within the Department of Biology; the Director reports to the department chair. The Director is expected to teach a minimum of two courses per year within the Department of Biology. Courses might include Vertebrate Zoology, Environmental Education with an Emphasis on Natural History, Local Flora and Fauna, Museum Studies, and Exhibit Development.

Required Qualifications:

At least a Master's degree in an appropriate disciplinary or museum field; candidates who hold a BA/BS and have significant, wide-ranging experience as a museum professional will be considered. Particularly important is a background in exhibit creation and development and the management of collections, especially vertebrates and mollusks.

Preferred Qualifications:

Experience as a naturalist, project manager, and environmental educator.

To Apply:

Applicants should submit letter of interest, resume, and list of three references to miamioh.hiretouch.com/job-details?jobID=1458.

Direct inquiries to Darlene Davidson at davidsmd [at] miamioh [dot] edu. Screening of applications begins August 10, 2015, and will continue until the position is filled.

Miami University, an equal opportunity/affirmative action employer with smoke- and tobacco-free campuses, is committed to a multicultural environment and strongly encourages applications from minorities, females, veterans and individuals with disabilities. Miami’s Annual Security and Fire Safety Report with information on campus crime, fires, and safety may be found at www.MiamiOH.edu/campussafety/annual-report/index.html. Hard copy available upon request. Employment will require a criminal background check according to University guidelines.

Postgraduate Researcher - Animal Care and Use

Date Posted: 21 Jul 2015 (Show details)

Institution: United States Forest Service
Location: Washington, DC
Closing date: not provided

The U.S. Forest Serviceis (USFS) is seeking post-graduate (Bachelor or Masters) applicants to help establish and implement a new research and development program: the Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee. The successful candidate will contribute to the launch of this new program, interacting with national and regional R&D research leaders and handling operational tasks out of the Washington Office. The diverse range of tasks presents an opportunity for directly influencing the success of this program and improving USFS scientific efforts.

Detailed information about this position and the application process is available at www.zintellect.com/Posting/details/1182.

Ph.D Position in Population Genetics in Australian Streams

Date Posted: 9 Jul 2015 (Show details)

Institution: University of Canberra
Location: Canberra, Australia
Closing date: not provided

A Ph.D. project is available at the University of Canberra studying the drivers of fine scale genetic spatial structuring in aquatic organisms in eastern Australia with a focus on the Murray-Darling Basin, Lake Eyre Basin and Clarence River system.

Our central aim is to determine the spatial scale at which species are genetically structured in riverine ecosystems. The spatial scale of population sub-structuring provides indirect estimates of the degree of mixing between populations and the speed at which recolonization occurs in stream reaches following extirpation events, and so is a crucial component of the management of aquatic ecosystems and of restoration efforts. Despite its importance, genetic research across varying spatial scales is lacking for most aquatic species and river basins. Specifically, this project will address three questions:

  • How does genetic structure within aquatic species vary across the riverine landscape at the spatial scales of river reaches, tributaries, major rivers and drainage basins?
  • Do more complex dendritic riverine networks show greater intra-specific genetic structure than linear systems at the same scale, and if so, why?
  • How has variation in fluvial geomorphic characteristics and current and long-term climatic variation influenced connectivity and the spatial scale in structuring riverine fauna over the last ~100,000 years?

We are collecting SNP (single nucleotide polymorphism) data for thousands of loci via next-generation sequencing for multiple species including fishes, turtles and shrimps from several focal catchments that have a range of dendritic structures across an aridity gradient with a variety of fluvial geomorphic characteristics and histories.

The options for the specific Ph.D. research questions are somewhat open, but projects would be expected to focus on developing and extending connectivity models that compare different network structures and incorporating and analysis our SNP datasets with these models. A strong background in modeling (knowledge in computer programming, statistical and spatial analysis using R) is important, while knowledge of genetic data, while helpful is not crucial. The Ph.D. project is part of a recently successfully granted ARC Linkage project; the detailed project description is available on request. Students would be supervised by some combination of Bernd Gruber, Peter Unmack, Duanne White or Arthur Georges and others, depending on the final project details.

Important Points

  • This project and the PhD candidature will be administered through the University of Canberra.
  • You will need to have completed a B.Sc. and some subsequent form of research-focussed degree (an M.Sc., or in the Australian/New Zealand system, an Honors year) to be considered.
  • If you are an Australian or New Zealand citizen or Australian permanent resident, you would be eligible to be considered for an APA Stipend Scholarship, and would be eligible for exemption from tuition fee payments under the Australian Government’s Research Training Scheme (RTS). An APA stipend scholarship is currently valued at $28,549pa. A small number of top-up Scholarships valued at $5,000 pa are also available;
  • If you are not an Australian or New Zealand citizen or Australian permanent resident, unless you are the recipient of a competitive merit based scholarship, you will be liable for upfront fees, at a rate of approximately $AUS 20k p.a.

To Apply:

If you are interested in applying, please send an email to Peter Unmack (peter [dot] unmack [at] canberra [dot] edu [dot] au) and provide the following information:

  • An expression of interest, and some general background of your past experience, qualifications, and expertise relevant to this project;
  • A copy of your CV;
  • Preferably, copies of all your academic transcripts (B.Sc. and subsequent degrees) to demonstrate which specific subjects you have undertaken.

Ph.D Position in Australian Freshwater Fishes

Date Posted: 9 Jul 2015 (Show details)

Institution: University of Canberra
Location: Canberra, Australia
Closing date: not provided

A PhD project is available at the University of Canberra studying the evolutionary origins of sexually-parasitic ‘unisexual’ lineages in carp gudgeons (Eleotridae: genus Hypseleotris).

Vertebrate groups that harbour both sexual and unisexual taxa have been highly prized as testing grounds for a range of big-picture questions in evolutionary biology. However, such groups are extremely rare, and none thus far has provided the optimal mix of biological features required to fully explore these questions. Our project has three general aims for newly-discovered instances of unisexuality in carp gudgeons:

  • Establish this group as a powerful vertebrate model for the study of unisexuality and of the evolutionary significance of sex;
  • Test six ‘standard’ hypotheses about the evolutionary attributes of vertebrate unisexuals'
  • Provide the essential genomic and morphological criteria required to uniquely identify each sexual and sexually-parasitic taxon in this hugely-important but neglected complex of freshwater fishes, prominent residents of Australia’s most-intensively studied waterways.

These aims will be achieved using a combination of multiple genetic technologies (allozymes, mtDNA, next-generation DNA), laboratory breeding trials, basic ecological studies, and morphological assessments.

Unisexual carp gudgeons represent the first example of sexual parasitism in any Australian vertebrate, the first new instance in a vertebrate world-wide in over 20 years, and only the fourth vertebrate example of an all-male hybridogen. As part of our broader project, we expect the successful elucidation of the number, nature, and evolutionary origins of unisexual lineages in carp gudgeons, underpinned by a solid taxonomic framework, laboratory husbandry protocols, and breeding experimentation, to trigger a considerable volume of theoretical and applied research, both in Australia and world-wide.

Carp gudgeons are among the most abundant native fishes in south eastern Australia, where they comprise ~6 sexual species (three of which are undescribed). Four of these sexual species are known to mate with (and thus help perpetuate) sexually parasitic lineages, while another “species” (Lakes carp gudgeon) is currently only known from its genetic signature in some unisexual lineages (i.e. the sexual ancestor appears to be extinct). Ecologically these fishes offer great opportunities for research, since multiple sexual and unisexual forms often occur at the same site, both in the Murray-Darling Basin and the coastal drainages along central eastern Australia. Research into the ecology and evolution of these fishes remains limited, so all new investigations will be groud-breaking.

The options for the specific Ph.D. research questions are wide open, but projects examining evolutionary questions around their reproduction in aquariums, aspects of their ecology in the wild or examining morphological variation are preferred. The Ph.D. project is part of a recently successfully granted ARC Discovery project; the detailed project description is available on request. Students would be supervised by Peter Unmack (UC), Mark Adams (SA Museum) and others, depending on the project.

Important Points:

  • This project and the PhD candidature will be administered through the University of Canberra.
  • You will need to have completed a B.Sc. and some subsequent form of research-focussed degree (an M.Sc., or in the Australian/New Zealand system, an Honors year) to be considered.
  • If you are an Australian or New Zealand citizen or Australian permanent resident, you would be eligible to be considered for an APA Stipend Scholarship, and would be eligible for exemption from tuition fee payments under the Australian Government’s Research Training Scheme (RTS). An APA stipend scholarship is currently valued at $28,549pa.  A small number of top-up Scholarships valued at $5,000 pa are also available.
  • If you are not an Australian or New Zealand citizen or Australian permanent resident, unless you are the recipient of a competitive merit based scholarship, you will be liable for upfront fees, at a rate of approximately $AUS 20k p.a.

To Apply:

If you are interested in applying, please email Peter Unmack (peter [dot] unmack [at] canberra [dot] edu [dot] au) and provide the following information:

  • An expression of interest, and some general background of your past experience, qualifications, and expertise relevant to this project
  • A copy of your CV
  • Preferably, copies of all your academic transcripts (B.Sc. and subsequent degrees) to demonstrate which specific subjects you have undertaken.

Herpetology Paid Internship

Date Posted: 28 Jun 2015 (Show details)

Institution: University of Florida, Fort Lauderdale
Location: Fort Lauderdale, Florida
Closing date: 10 July, 2015

The Department of Wildlife Ecology and Conservation at the University of Florida Fort Lauderdale Research and Education Center is seeking an enthusiastic individual for immediate hire. Intern will assist with projects related to research and monitoring of native and invasive reptiles in southern Florida. Candidates will be expected to work 40 hours a week, including occasional nights, for a period of 12-16 weeks with possibility of promotion to Wildlife Technician dependent upon performance and funding. Additional descriptions of ongoing research can be found at crocdoc.ifas.ufl.edu/.

The salary is $200/week. Shared housing may be available. The position starts soon as the candidate is identified and available, ideally August or September 2015.

Duties

Intern will work with scientists and managers from the University of Florida as well as state and federal agencies. Primary duties include radio tracking, live trapping, and camera trapping for Argentine Black & White Tegus (50%), as well as herpetofaunal surveys (20%), necropsy of select specimens (20%), and American Crocodile data collection (10%). This opportunity will provide necessary training and exposure to arduous conditions of southern Florida and hands-on experience with native and invasive exotic reptiles. This position has an intensive and demanding field component. Additional duties include data entry and other tasks as assigned. Depending on availability, intern may have occasional opportunities to participate in other research projects.

Qualifications

  • Possess or pursuing degree in ecology, biology, wildlife, environmental science, or related field
  • Maintain work quality and positive attitude in challenging, muddy, rocky, remote settings in hot and humid weather with biting insects, alligators, and venomous snakes
  • Excellent communication skills and accurate data recording are essential
  • Ability to work independently and with others in a fast-paced environment
  • Possession or ability to obtain a valid Florida’s driver’s license
  • Experience navigating off-trail with aid of GPS and compass
  • Working knowledge of South Florida ecosystems and wildlife, experience operating vehicles with 4WD and manual transmissions, native wildlife identification, and wilderness first aid/first aid/CPR training is helpful but not required

To Apply

Please send letter of interest and resume or CV by email to Mike Rochford at crocdoc_jobs [at] hotmail [dot] com and use subject heading “Summer Biological Intern.” The application deadline is July 10, 2015.

Gila Monster
photo of a crawfish frog, Lithobates areolata
Diamonback Terrapin